NonSociety – Live Differently. Julia's Press Media Personality

Following My Lifecast: Here's a glimpse into my life. Scroll to the right to view chronologically, and click 'earlier' to see more.

Mar 16, 09 12:00am
Selected Excerpts:
Her life is her brand, and her brand is her job.
A Google search of Julia Allison returns 154,000 results and 27,000 people search Google for her on a monthly basis (according to the Google Adwords Keyword Tool). As I walked into her studio apartment/office in Clinton, however, I wondered what it has accomplished for her. My first inclination was to attempt to uncover what she believed her business, NonSociety, actually to be, so that I could easily challenge her business model.
Assuming that she planned to get paid at some point, it made sense to me that she was attempting to position herself, along with her two best friends, as a marketing agency, selling the strategic Julia Allisonization of brands. Even if her approach turned out to be as simple as the celebrity endorsement angle, I was sure she couldn’t sell the package to a realistic clientele. My question then became “Does she actually know how she did it? Can she turn cute Sally Cubicle into Julia Allison, or was she born with a unique gift?”
When I asked her what her goal was, she responded that she intended to become a “Mini Oprah.” The resolution in her voice almost compelled me to ask her if I could maybe be her “Mini Gayle.” Whatever her platform, Julia Allison is in the business of developing Julia Allison, whether it be Julia Allison the dating columnist, Julia Allison the TV anchor, or Julia Allison the “Mini Oprah.”
The interesting part is that, while some people leverage their medium (i.e., a job as a dating columnist at Time Out) to reach people, Julia makes sure she’s bigger than her medium. Some say she’s arrogant to think people are that interested in her life, but all she does is obsessively leverage social media to put it on display. It’s our choice whether or not to engage.
She’s enchantingly engaging, addictive to speak to, and a master at controlling the message she wants to convey (i.e., her brand).
In the end, she IS the starving actress waiting tables. She’s just not waiting for her big break — she’s ensuring that she’s able to control it.
Interview Transcript: 
JBA: You love press.
Julia: No, I don’t. That’s a common misconception… I don’t think all press is good press.
JBA: Well, if you don’t love the attention, why do you do it?
Julia: There’s a lot of good attention. I think that any writer wants more than anything for people to read their writing.
JBA: So you’re saying you did it all to promote yourself as a writer for Time Out?
Julia: Right. That’s why I originally started.
JBA: So that is the brand — Julia Allison the writer?


Julia: Yes, but the goal was always to entertain…the goal was to get people to read my writing.
…
JBA: So how are you going to make money in the next five years?
Julia: Hopefully we’ll sell — well, “we” meaning myself and I and Lilly [her dog] over there [laughs] — we’ll sell a book, we’ll sell a company, we’ll sell a television show, and we’ll sell a screenplay. That’s the goal.
JBA: It is rumored you are leaving Time Out. Is that true?
Julia: I have loved being a dating columnist, but Carrie Bradshaw 2.0 is played out. I think I’m columned out right now.
…
JBA: So what is the next step?
Julia: TMI Weekly was just picked up by NBC’s new channel, New York Nonstop. We will tape two episodes a week, and we will be on the cable channel and then hopefully in the backs of cabs soon, fingers crossed. NonSociety is my platform for writing, and then, I mean … you know, I’ve always contemplated doing a book, and I have a pilot at Bravo.
JBA: How does the Julia Allison brand generate or try to generate revenue?
Julia: Oh, that’s a good question.
JBA: It should be a good question.
Julia: I’ve started to do a lot of public speaking. I’ve spoken to all the senior execs at A&E, and the top three hundred marketing execs at Unilever.
JBA: You had mentioned to me that you were looking to act in some ways like a marketing agency.
Julia: So that’s the other thing that NonSociety does specifically. We take the [standard] click-through ad sales and tweak it so it’s much more personal — going out to companies that we actually believe in genuinely and giving them product endorsements. That’s a little bit different than the average celebrity endorsement. Obviously we’re not, you know, Jennifer Aniston.
…
JBA: But still, what does a client buy specifically?  If they buy a campaign with Julia Allison, what do they get?
Julia: What we did for Kodak, we went to Vegas for the consumer electronics show, and instead of just being like “Hey, there are some great Kodak cameras here,” we used them, we lifecasted from the Kodak booth, and we approached it from [several angles]. People look at us like we’re their friends, so when we recommend something it has a hell of a lot more value than an ad.
JBA: It is many people’s perception that you have created an empire, but again, how are you going to make money?
Julia: There are two main ways to do that. The way you make real money, serious money, cannot be dependent on your own time. It can’t be dependent on me writing more articles. You can make what? $50,000 a year? You can found a company where you start to utilize other people’s time resources, or you get to a point where you have other people doing great marketing and ad sales, or you can sell it.
…
JBA: When people ask you how you did it, how did you do it?
Julia: I don’t follow rules.  I think you just have to be persistent.
…
FINAL THOUGHT: 
Her perception of NonSociety as a marketing company and, further, a sellable property (for acquisition and even to acquire prospective clients) is quite a stretch. Her usage of it as a platform to communicate is very effective. I think if Julia stays in the business of creating celebrity for herself, she will ensure that she develops a successful career in entertainment. Her charm is intoxicating, infectious, and disarming. The celebrity of Julia Allison has not peaked.

Selected Excerpts:

Her life is her brand, and her brand is her job.

A Google search of Julia Allison returns 154,000 results and 27,000 people search Google for her on a monthly basis (according to the Google Adwords Keyword Tool). As I walked into her studio apartment/office in Clinton, however, I wondered what it has accomplished for her. My first inclination was to attempt to uncover what she believed her business, NonSociety, actually to be, so that I could easily challenge her business model.

Assuming that she planned to get paid at some point, it made sense to me that she was attempting to position herself, along with her two best friends, as a marketing agency, selling the strategic Julia Allisonization of brands. Even if her approach turned out to be as simple as the celebrity endorsement angle, I was sure she couldn’t sell the package to a realistic clientele. My question then became “Does she actually know how she did it? Can she turn cute Sally Cubicle into Julia Allison, or was she born with a unique gift?”

When I asked her what her goal was, she responded that she intended to become a “Mini Oprah.” The resolution in her voice almost compelled me to ask her if I could maybe be her “Mini Gayle.” Whatever her platform, Julia Allison is in the business of developing Julia Allison, whether it be Julia Allison the dating columnist, Julia Allison the TV anchor, or Julia Allison the “Mini Oprah.”

The interesting part is that, while some people leverage their medium (i.e., a job as a dating columnist at Time Out) to reach people, Julia makes sure she’s bigger than her medium. Some say she’s arrogant to think people are that interested in her life, but all she does is obsessively leverage social media to put it on display. It’s our choice whether or not to engage.

She’s enchantingly engaging, addictive to speak to, and a master at controlling the message she wants to convey (i.e., her brand).

In the end, she IS the starving actress waiting tables. She’s just not waiting for her big break — she’s ensuring that she’s able to control it.

Interview Transcript:

JBA: You love press.

Julia: No, I don’t. That’s a common misconception… I don’t think all press is good press.

JBA: Well, if you don’t love the attention, why do you do it?

Julia: There’s a lot of good attention. I think that any writer wants more than anything for people to read their writing.

JBA: So you’re saying you did it all to promote yourself as a writer for Time Out?

Julia: Right. That’s why I originally started.

JBA: So that is the brand — Julia Allison the writer?

Julia: Yes, but the goal was always to entertain…the goal was to get people to read my writing.

JBA: So how are you going to make money in the next five years?

Julia: Hopefully we’ll sell — well, “we” meaning myself and I and Lilly [her dog] over there [laughs] — we’ll sell a book, we’ll sell a company, we’ll sell a television show, and we’ll sell a screenplay. That’s the goal.

JBA: It is rumored you are leaving Time Out. Is that true?

Julia: I have loved being a dating columnist, but Carrie Bradshaw 2.0 is played out. I think I’m columned out right now.

JBA: So what is the next step?

Julia: TMI Weekly was just picked up by NBC’s new channel, New York Nonstop. We will tape two episodes a week, and we will be on the cable channel and then hopefully in the backs of cabs soon, fingers crossed. NonSociety is my platform for writing, and then, I mean … you know, I’ve always contemplated doing a book, and I have a pilot at Bravo.

JBA: How does the Julia Allison brand generate or try to generate revenue?

Julia: Oh, that’s a good question.

JBA: It should be a good question.

Julia: I’ve started to do a lot of public speaking. I’ve spoken to all the senior execs at A&E, and the top three hundred marketing execs at Unilever.

JBA: You had mentioned to me that you were looking to act in some ways like a marketing agency.

Julia: So that’s the other thing that NonSociety does specifically. We take the [standard] click-through ad sales and tweak it so it’s much more personal — going out to companies that we actually believe in genuinely and giving them product endorsements. That’s a little bit different than the average celebrity endorsement. Obviously we’re not, you know, Jennifer Aniston.

JBA: But still, what does a client buy specifically? If they buy a campaign with Julia Allison, what do they get?

Julia: What we did for Kodak, we went to Vegas for the consumer electronics show, and instead of just being like “Hey, there are some great Kodak cameras here,” we used them, we lifecasted from the Kodak booth, and we approached it from [several angles]. People look at us like we’re their friends, so when we recommend something it has a hell of a lot more value than an ad.

JBA: It is many people’s perception that you have created an empire, but again, how are you going to make money?

Julia: There are two main ways to do that. The way you make real money, serious money, cannot be dependent on your own time. It can’t be dependent on me writing more articles. You can make what? $50,000 a year? You can found a company where you start to utilize other people’s time resources, or you get to a point where you have other people doing great marketing and ad sales, or you can sell it.

JBA: When people ask you how you did it, how did you do it?

Julia: I don’t follow rules. I think you just have to be persistent.


FINAL THOUGHT:

Her perception of NonSociety as a marketing company and, further, a sellable property (for acquisition and even to acquire prospective clients) is quite a stretch. Her usage of it as a platform to communicate is very effective. I think if Julia stays in the business of creating celebrity for herself, she will ensure that she develops a successful career in entertainment. Her charm is intoxicating, infectious, and disarming. The celebrity of Julia Allison has not peaked.

Jan 01, 09 12:00am
Sheridan Road Magazine: A Media Goddess
Wilmette native Julia Allison has created a name for herself in New York’s media industry. She gives a lot of credit to her time at New Trier High School, where she gained her indefatigable ambition.
By Evangeline Politis
New Trier graduate Julia Allison seems to be involved in every aspect of media in New York City. Over the past few years, she has done nearly 400 television appearances on networks such as Fox News and CNN. As a talking head, she has discussed everything from Britney Spears’ custody fight to American Idol. Julia is also a dating columnist and special correspondent at Time Out New York. She has done public speaking on personal branding and personality-driven marketing and is the cofounder of her own Web site- the focus of most of her efforts these days. Julia was appropriately named the “most famous young journalist in the city” by New York Magazine, and has thousands of people reading her blog every day.
In high school, Julia was equally involved. She was on the air at New Trier’s radio station, in Latin Club, on the debate team, the president of Animal Protection Club, an opinion columnist for the New Trier news, ran the turnabout dance through the Global Exchange Club, even “attempted” to synchronize swim for two years, and the list goes on from there. “I was an overachiever, but I wasn’t very good at it,” she says jokingly.
In school, she always enjoyed literature and English classes and hated math (she actually finagled her way out of taking math classes past sophomore year). Though she claims she was horrible at it, one of her favorite subjects was debate. Through this outlet, she honed in the public speaking skills she now uses every day.
Her favorite class was an Advanced Placement course called Great Books in which the students analyzed the meaning of famous literary pieces. Ironically, she didn’t love her journalism class, which was very traditionally taught. “My teacher believed that the steps to become a newspaper journalist are very resolute and intractable. I ignored every single one of those steps and thank God I did. Otherwise, I think I would be stuck at the metro desk somewhere,” she explains.
She does look back fondly at her opinions column in the New Trier News, an outlet very similar to her blog now. She wrote about all sorts of student issues, such as peer pressure, what to wear to a school dance, and even how turning 18 made her feel old-a subject the twentysomething laughs at now. The column actually kick started her writing career and Julia has had a column ever since.
After graduation from New Trier in 1999, she went to Georgetown University, where she majored in political science. While she received an incredible education from Georgetown, she still says that New Trier prepared her for things that college didn’t. “New Trier was a bastion of relentless ambition. It was all focused on getting into the right college, but it was all the same ambition that fuels me today in New York and it’s just directed toward a slightly different arena. I have to say, I didn’t necessarily see that even at Georgetown. There were ambitious people there, but I swear to god, nothing like New Trier,” she says.
She explains further that there is a certain level of achievement expected from New Trier students. Many of her close friends from high school went to schools such as Stanford, Johns Hopkins, and Columbia and have all succeeded admirably. She compares her friends to her other people her age who are getting married and having kids. Julia’s friends, on the other hand, are finishing up law degrees or graduate programs at some of the top institutions in the world- “the normal for New Trier,” she explains.
Like the rest of her New Trier classmates, Julia is making quite a name for herself. Her primary job at the moment is as the co-founder of NonSociety, “which is what we like to describe as the next generation’s multimedia magazine,” explains Julia. “And it’s 100 percent personality driven.” The Web site www.nonsociety.com provides a view into Julia’s life through her blog, which she updates daily with pictures, quotes, links, and movies. Her two best friends, Meghan Asha and Mary Rambin, also blog on the site- Julia writes about dating, Meghan about technology, and Mary about fashion. This fall, the three women launched TMI Weekly, www.tmiweekly.com, where they chat about subjects like “Snacks Without Shame” and “Awesome Gadget Gifts” in a roundtable setting.
Julia wonders how high school at New Trier would have been with the social networking Web sites and blogs. “It would be really interesting to see how the internet would have changed my high school experience. I wonder if there’s a blog chronicling the social lives of teenagers.  That could have been fascinating … or terrifying!”

Sheridan Road Magazine: A Media Goddess

Wilmette native Julia Allison has created a name for herself in New York’s media industry. She gives a lot of credit to her time at New Trier High School, where she gained her indefatigable ambition.

By Evangeline Politis

New Trier graduate Julia Allison seems to be involved in every aspect of media in New York City. Over the past few years, she has done nearly 400 television appearances on networks such as Fox News and CNN. As a talking head, she has discussed everything from Britney Spears’ custody fight to American Idol. Julia is also a dating columnist and special correspondent at Time Out New York. She has done public speaking on personal branding and personality-driven marketing and is the cofounder of her own Web site- the focus of most of her efforts these days. Julia was appropriately named the “most famous young journalist in the city” by New York Magazine, and has thousands of people reading her blog every day.

In high school, Julia was equally involved. She was on the air at New Trier’s radio station, in Latin Club, on the debate team, the president of Animal Protection Club, an opinion columnist for the New Trier news, ran the turnabout dance through the Global Exchange Club, even “attempted” to synchronize swim for two years, and the list goes on from there. “I was an overachiever, but I wasn’t very good at it,” she says jokingly.

In school, she always enjoyed literature and English classes and hated math (she actually finagled her way out of taking math classes past sophomore year). Though she claims she was horrible at it, one of her favorite subjects was debate. Through this outlet, she honed in the public speaking skills she now uses every day.

Her favorite class was an Advanced Placement course called Great Books in which the students analyzed the meaning of famous literary pieces. Ironically, she didn’t love her journalism class, which was very traditionally taught. “My teacher believed that the steps to become a newspaper journalist are very resolute and intractable. I ignored every single one of those steps and thank God I did. Otherwise, I think I would be stuck at the metro desk somewhere,” she explains.

She does look back fondly at her opinions column in the New Trier News, an outlet very similar to her blog now. She wrote about all sorts of student issues, such as peer pressure, what to wear to a school dance, and even how turning 18 made her feel old-a subject the twentysomething laughs at now. The column actually kick started her writing career and Julia has had a column ever since.

After graduation from New Trier in 1999, she went to Georgetown University, where she majored in political science. While she received an incredible education from Georgetown, she still says that New Trier prepared her for things that college didn’t. “New Trier was a bastion of relentless ambition. It was all focused on getting into the right college, but it was all the same ambition that fuels me today in New York and it’s just directed toward a slightly different arena. I have to say, I didn’t necessarily see that even at Georgetown. There were ambitious people there, but I swear to god, nothing like New Trier,” she says.

She explains further that there is a certain level of achievement expected from New Trier students. Many of her close friends from high school went to schools such as Stanford, Johns Hopkins, and Columbia and have all succeeded admirably. She compares her friends to her other people her age who are getting married and having kids. Julia’s friends, on the other hand, are finishing up law degrees or graduate programs at some of the top institutions in the world- “the normal for New Trier,” she explains.

Like the rest of her New Trier classmates, Julia is making quite a name for herself. Her primary job at the moment is as the co-founder of NonSociety, “which is what we like to describe as the next generation’s multimedia magazine,” explains Julia. “And it’s 100 percent personality driven.” The Web site www.nonsociety.com provides a view into Julia’s life through her blog, which she updates daily with pictures, quotes, links, and movies. Her two best friends, Meghan Asha and Mary Rambin, also blog on the site- Julia writes about dating, Meghan about technology, and Mary about fashion. This fall, the three women launched TMI Weekly, www.tmiweekly.com, where they chat about subjects like “Snacks Without Shame” and “Awesome Gadget Gifts” in a roundtable setting.

Julia wonders how high school at New Trier would have been with the social networking Web sites and blogs. “It would be really interesting to see how the internet would have changed my high school experience. I wonder if there’s a blog chronicling the social lives of teenagers.  That could have been fascinating … or terrifying!”

Nov 22, 08 1:36pm
The Sydney Morning Herald’s Good Weekend

The Sydney Morning Herald’s Good Weekend

Nov 22, 08 7:00am
The Sydney Morning Herald

The Sydney Morning Herald

Nov 14, 08 6:43am
Quintessentially Magazine - I Adore NY: Meghan Asha & Julia Allison On All the Skinny
JA: Is there anything more New York than the Four Seasons? I had one of my best ever dates here. He bought me the cotton candy- so romantic!MA: Where else do you eat?JA: The Waverly Inn. I’m obsessed with it, although I realize it’s not cool to be obsessed with something so trendy. Small, amazing West Village atmosphere. There’s an understated class and air about it. But its still homey. I go once every couple of weeks. The maitre’d there, Larry, is just so incredibly sweet.MA: I love it too. Even the $50 macaroni and cheese - amazing. I love that you have to have the secret number to get a reservation. And that the front room’s not as good as the back room…JA: No, no! The back room’s not as good as the front room.MA: Sorry, right, right!JA: Every New Yorker goes through a phase where you want to try every restaurant. I had an Excel spreadsheet when I first got here. But now I try to find a place where I’m comfortable. Like Perry Street.MA: Love Perry Street. The food is outstanding. There’s a tuna appetizer there I can’t get enough of.JA: I like a restaurant where you can be low profile. But if you want to be high profile…MA: Then go to Downtown Cipriani where everybody looks you up and down and the women are dressed to the nines. You go there if you’re in the mood to wear something…Missoni. JA: Yeah and hang out with Euros. I love the risotto there. What about people watching.MA: Rooftop of Soho houseJA: You know that’s amazing for people watching on a Saturday morning? Pastis. I know that it’s trendy and been around forever, but it’s an institution. Going and sitting outside on a summer morning is divine.MA: See, I’m more into the late night scene. Like karaoke at Winnie’s, or at one of those private places in Korea Town, with the disco balls and the soju. Or the show at the Box.JA: That’s so New York- nowhere else would you see a stage show with great singer’s, with crazy drug and culture references and men who have, um, female parts. And it gets seedier as the night goes on.MA: It’s a great date place for a bad date- you can go there and just sit and watch the show the whole time.JA: But my favorite bar in New York is the Rose Bar at the Gramercy.MA: Oh, agree! With the Warhol paintings on the walls…JA: And they infuse it with wood scent- I think there’s crack in the scent because it makes me happy the second I walk in. It’s quiet enough that you can hear yourself talk- you could have a meeting there or you could have a deliciously romantic date. There’s something sultry about that place.MA: The whole crew from Entourage was there the last time I went. The rooftop there is very cool, but it’s private. And of course there’s Beatrice and Milk and Honey still going strong.JA: There’s a great bar in Tribeca- the Brandy Library. It looks like your very rich uncle’ study. Lovely atmosphere, perfect for closing the big deal.MA: Whatever that big deal might be…JA: Ha! Ok, ready? Lightning round. Best place for power coffee. Go.MA: Um Balthazar. Now You. Power Lunch.JA: Michael’s, obviously. All the media heavy hitters. Also Town in the Chambers Hotel. And of course, right here there’s the Four Seasons. MA: Good ones. I’d add 11 Madison. Their new chef, Daniel Humm, is incredible.JA: What about… cupcakes?MA: Don’t do Magnolias, only tourists line up there. Two Little Red Hens on the Upper East Side- their blackout chocolate cupcake is the best. JA: But the number one cupcake place in New York is Sugar Sweet Sunshine on Rivington.MA: Ok, more the best health food place?JA: Liquiteria on 11th Street and 2nd Avenue. I have a beet-juice smoothie there every single morning.MA: Let’s do shopping.JA: My favorite new handbag designer is Mary Rambin [JA Ed Note: HA! I always promote my girls]. Her Moe bags are ridiculously addictive. She has these beautiful bags that loop to your wrist. You can get them at Henri Bendels.MA: If it’s shoes your after, it’s Barneys or Christian Louboutin. But generally I love going to the young designers’ market every Saturday and Sunday on Mott street in SoHo.JA: Or the consignment stores on the Upper East Side because the ladies –who-lunch abandon their designer cast-offs there. They always have big labels for cheap- Marc Jacobs, Miu Miu, Oscar de la Renta. The Spence-Chapin Thrift Shop is a good one.  But of course, if your shopping with the rich boyfriend, the first place to go would be Jeffrey’s in Meatpacking.MA: And don’t forget Bergdorf’s for handbags and dresses. For antique jewelry, you want to go to this little place on the Lower East Side, called Pippin.JA: Ooh, speaking of vintage, Screaming Mimi’s on Lafayette. Incredible vintage clothing. Lots of designers and stylists go there.MA: And what about if you’re buying for a man?JA: Thomas Pink for shirts. Paul Smith for everything. And when you’re done there and want to buy something for yourself, pop into Diane von Furstenberg’s gorgeous new store.MA: OK, we have to talk about gyms. The number one gym that everyone is talking about is the Equinox at Columbus Circle. They’re obsessed with it.JA: That and the equinox in SoHo. And my metrosexual ex is obsessed with Clay on 14th. Exclusive. There is only one, and it’s totally exclusive. What about hair stylists?MA: Ty Holbrook at John Frieda. Best haircut I’ve ever gotten.JA: All the anchors and TV personalities go to the Ted Gibson Salon on 23rd and Fifth.  There’s a guy named Jason who does colour there who’s supposed to be just amazing. OK, hotels?MA: I had a long-distant relationship last year so I know all the hotels. I like Gramercy, which is dark and bordello-esque. It’s the place to put your mistress, not your mom. And the Mercer. And I love the spa at the Mandarin in the Time Warner Center.JA: But the best massage in the city is called Asian Tui-Na. If you like it rough, and I do, this is the place to go. Great acupuncture, too.MA: And the best thing, period, to do in New York?JA: Just walking around! The Battery Park Promenade, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, West Village.MA: And if you’re talkative, go stand in line at the Shake Shack in Madison Park. Meeting people there is better than the burgers, and that’s really saying something!As overheard by Brian Farnham, editor-in-chief of Time Out New YorkMeghan Asha is a socialite and former model who works in hedge funds.Julia Allison is the dating columnist for Time Out New York and  an editor-at-large for Star magazine.Eat & Drink & DanceBalthazar80 Spring St. between Broadway and Crosby Sts212.965.1414Beatrice Inn [SHUT DOWN!]285 W 12th St212.243.4626The Box189 Chrystie St between Rivington and Stanton Sts212.982.9301The Brandy Library25 N. Moore St at Varick St212.226.5545Eleven Madison Park11 Madison Ave at 24th St212.889.0905The Four Seasons99 E 52nd St212.754.9494Liquiteria170 2nd Ave212.358.0300Michael’s 24 W 55th St between Fifth and Sixth Aves212.767.0555Milk and Honey134 Eldridge St between Broome and Delancey StsunlistedPastis9 Ninth Ave at Little W 12th St212.929.4844The Rose Bar at the Gramercy2 Lexington Ave212.920.3300SoHo House29-35 Ninth Ave between 13th and 14th Sts212.627.9800Sugar Sweet Sunshine126 Rivington St212.995.1960Town in the Chambers Hotel15 W 56th St between Fifth and Sixth Aves212.582.4445Two Little Red Hens1652 Second Ave at 86th212.452.0476The Waverley Inn16 Bank St212.243.7900Winnie’s 104 Bayard St between Baxter and Mulberry Sts212.732.2364Shop & Sleep & Health
Asian Tui-Na327 E 28th St212.686.8082
Bergdorf’s754 Fifth Ave212-753-7300 Clay 25 W. 14th St, 2nd floor212-206-9200 Christian Louboutin 59 Horatio St212-255-1910 Diane von Furstenberg 874 Washington St646-486-4800 Equinox (multiple locations) 895 Broadway (corporate address) 212-774-6363 Gramercy Hotel 2 Lexington Ave212-475-4320 Henri Bendels 712 Fifth Ave between 55th & 56th Sts212-582-8283 John Frieda 797 Madison Ave212-879-1000The Mandarin Hotel Spa80 Columbus Circle212-805-8880 The Mercer Hotel 147 Mercer St212-966-6060 Paul Smith 108 Fifth Ave at 16th St212-627-9770 Pippin 72 Orchard St212-505-5159 Screaming Mimi’s 382 Lafayette St212-677-6464 Spence-Chapin Thrift Shop 1473 Third Ave, 212-737-8448 1850 Second Ave, 212-426-7643 Ted Gibson Salon 184 Fifth Ave, 2nd floor 212-633-6333 Thomas Pink 10 Columbus Circle at 60th St, 212-826-9650 Young Designer’s Market on Mott St, 268 Mulberry St 212-580-8995

Quintessentially Magazine - I Adore NY: Meghan Asha & Julia Allison On All the Skinny

JA: Is there anything more New York than the Four Seasons? I had one of my best ever dates here. He bought me the cotton candy- so romantic!
MA:
Where else do you eat?
JA: The Waverly Inn. I’m obsessed with it, although I realize it’s not cool to be obsessed with something so trendy. Small, amazing West Village atmosphere. There’s an understated class and air about it. But its still homey. I go once every couple of weeks. The maitre’d there, Larry, is just so incredibly sweet.
MA: I love it too. Even the $50 macaroni and cheese - amazing. I love that you have to have the secret number to get a reservation. And that the front room’s not as good as the back room…
JA: No, no! The back room’s not as good as the front room.
MA: Sorry, right, right!
JA: Every New Yorker goes through a phase where you want to try every restaurant. I had an Excel spreadsheet when I first got here. But now I try to find a place where I’m comfortable. Like Perry Street.
MA: Love Perry Street. The food is outstanding. There’s a tuna appetizer there I can’t get enough of.
JA: I like a restaurant where you can be low profile. But if you want to be high profile…
MA: Then go to Downtown Cipriani where everybody looks you up and down and the women are dressed to the nines. You go there if you’re in the mood to wear something…Missoni.
JA: Yeah and hang out with Euros. I love the risotto there. What about people watching.
MA: Rooftop of Soho house
JA: You know that’s amazing for people watching on a Saturday morning? Pastis. I know that it’s trendy and been around forever, but it’s an institution. Going and sitting outside on a summer morning is divine.
MA: See, I’m more into the late night scene. Like karaoke at Winnie’s, or at one of those private places in Korea Town, with the disco balls and the soju. Or the show at the Box.
JA: That’s so New York- nowhere else would you see a stage show with great singer’s, with crazy drug and culture references and men who have, um, female parts. And it gets seedier as the night goes on.
MA: It’s a great date place for a bad date- you can go there and just sit and watch the show the whole time.
JA: But my favorite bar in New York is the Rose Bar at the Gramercy.
MA: Oh, agree! With the Warhol paintings on the walls…
JA:
And they infuse it with wood scent- I think there’s crack in the scent because it makes me happy the second I walk in. It’s quiet enough that you can hear yourself talk- you could have a meeting there or you could have a deliciously romantic date. There’s something sultry about that place.
MA:
The whole crew from Entourage was there the last time I went. The rooftop there is very cool, but it’s private. And of course there’s Beatrice and Milk and Honey still going strong.
JA: There’s a great bar in Tribeca- the Brandy Library. It looks like your very rich uncle’ study. Lovely atmosphere, perfect for closing the big deal.
MA: Whatever that big deal might be…
JA: Ha! Ok, ready? Lightning round. Best place for power coffee. Go.
MA: Um Balthazar. Now You. Power Lunch.
JA: Michael’s, obviously. All the media heavy hitters. Also Town in the Chambers Hotel. And of course, right here there’s the Four Seasons.
MA: Good ones. I’d add 11 Madison. Their new chef, Daniel Humm, is incredible.
JA: What about… cupcakes?
MA: Don’t do Magnolias, only tourists line up there. Two Little Red Hens on the Upper East Side- their blackout chocolate cupcake is the best.
JA: But the number one cupcake place in New York is Sugar Sweet Sunshine on Rivington.
MA: Ok, more the best health food place?
JA: Liquiteria on 11th Street and 2nd Avenue. I have a beet-juice smoothie there every single morning.
MA: Let’s do shopping.
JA: My favorite new handbag designer is Mary Rambin [JA Ed Note: HA! I always promote my girls]. Her Moe bags are ridiculously addictive. She has these beautiful bags that loop to your wrist. You can get them at Henri Bendels.
MA: If it’s shoes your after, it’s Barneys or Christian Louboutin. But generally I love going to the young designers’ market every Saturday and Sunday on Mott street in SoHo.
JA: Or the consignment stores on the Upper East Side because the ladies –who-lunch abandon their designer cast-offs there. They always have big labels for cheap- Marc Jacobs, Miu Miu, Oscar de la Renta. The Spence-Chapin Thrift Shop is a good one.  But of course, if your shopping with the rich boyfriend, the first place to go would be Jeffrey’s in Meatpacking.
MA: And don’t forget Bergdorf’s for handbags and dresses. For antique jewelry, you want to go to this little place on the Lower East Side, called Pippin.
JA: Ooh, speaking of vintage, Screaming Mimi’s on Lafayette. Incredible vintage clothing. Lots of designers and stylists go there.
MA: And what about if you’re buying for a man?
JA: Thomas Pink for shirts. Paul Smith for everything. And when you’re done there and want to buy something for yourself, pop into Diane von Furstenberg’s gorgeous new store.
MA: OK, we have to talk about gyms. The number one gym that everyone is talking about is the Equinox at Columbus Circle. They’re obsessed with it.
JA: That and the equinox in SoHo. And my metrosexual ex is obsessed with Clay on 14th. Exclusive. There is only one, and it’s totally exclusive. What about hair stylists?
MA: Ty Holbrook at John Frieda. Best haircut I’ve ever gotten.
JA: All the anchors and TV personalities go to the Ted Gibson Salon on 23rd and Fifth.  There’s a guy named Jason who does colour there who’s supposed to be just amazing. OK, hotels?
MA: I had a long-distant relationship last year so I know all the hotels. I like Gramercy, which is dark and bordello-esque. It’s the place to put your mistress, not your mom. And the Mercer. And I love the spa at the Mandarin in the Time Warner Center.
JA: But the best massage in the city is called Asian Tui-Na. If you like it rough, and I do, this is the place to go. Great acupuncture, too.
MA: And the best thing, period, to do in New York?
JA: Just walking around! The Battery Park Promenade, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, West Village.
MA: And if you’re talkative, go stand in line at the Shake Shack in Madison Park. Meeting people there is better than the burgers, and that’s really saying something!

As overheard by Brian Farnham, editor-in-chief of Time Out New York
Meghan Asha is a socialite and former model who works in hedge funds.
Julia Allison is the dating columnist for Time Out New York and  an editor-at-large for Star magazine.

Eat & Drink & Dance

Balthazar
80 Spring St. between Broadway and Crosby Sts
212.965.1414

Beatrice Inn [SHUT DOWN!]
285 W 12th St
212.243.4626


The Box
189 Chrystie St between Rivington and Stanton Sts
212.982.9301

The Brandy Library
25 N. Moore St at Varick St
212.226.5545

Eleven Madison Park
11 Madison Ave at 24th St
212.889.0905

The Four Seasons
99 E 52nd St
212.754.9494

Liquiteria
170 2nd Ave
212.358.0300

Michael’s
24 W 55th St between Fifth and Sixth Aves
212.767.0555

Milk and Honey
134 Eldridge St between Broome and Delancey Sts
unlisted

Pastis
9 Ninth Ave at Little W 12th St
212.929.4844

The Rose Bar at the Gramercy
2 Lexington Ave
212.920.3300

SoHo House

29-35 Ninth Ave between 13th and 14th Sts
212.627.9800

Sugar Sweet Sunshine
126 Rivington St
212.995.1960

Town in the Chambers Hotel
15 W 56th St between Fifth and Sixth Aves
212.582.4445

Two Little Red Hens
1652 Second Ave at 86th
212.452.0476

The Waverley Inn
16 Bank St
212.243.7900

Winnie’s
104 Bayard St between Baxter and Mulberry Sts
212.732.2364

Shop & Sleep & Health

Asian Tui-Na
327 E 28th St
212.686.8082

Bergdorf’s
754 Fifth Ave
212-753-7300 

Clay
25 W. 14th St, 2nd floor
212-206-9200 

Christian Louboutin
59 Horatio St
212-255-1910 

Diane von Furstenberg
874 Washington St
646-486-4800 

Equinox (multiple locations)
895 Broadway (corporate address)
212-774-6363 

Gramercy Hotel
2 Lexington Ave
212-475-4320 

Henri Bendels
712 Fifth Ave between 55th & 56th Sts
212-582-8283 

John Frieda
797 Madison Ave
212-879-1000

The Mandarin Hotel Spa
80 Columbus Circle
212-805-8880 

The Mercer Hotel
147 Mercer St
212-966-6060 

Paul Smith
108 Fifth Ave at 16th St
212-627-9770 

Pippin
72 Orchard St
212-505-5159 

Screaming Mimi’s
382 Lafayette St
212-677-6464 

Spence-Chapin Thrift Shop
1473 Third Ave, 212-737-8448 
1850 Second Ave, 212-426-7643 

Ted Gibson Salon
184 Fifth Ave, 2nd floor
212-633-6333 

Thomas Pink
10 Columbus Circle at 60th St,
212-826-9650 

Young Designer’s Market on Mott
St, 268 Mulberry St
212-580-8995

Nov 11, 08 10:54am
New York Magazine

New York Magazine

Nov 01, 08 8:49am
November 2008 - Elle UK

November 2008 - Elle UK

Sep 30, 08 10:41am
By David Sarno & Maria Russo
Over the last half-decade, enterprising Web auteurs have created — and we’re ballparking, but this feels right — hundreds of original Internet TV series. There are production companies that churn them out, websites that warehouse them, and vast armies of amateurs who own a camera and aren’t afraid to use it. But from that crowded landscape of Web TV shows, who among us can name more than, we don’t know, two? Even the standouts — “Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog,” “Pink,” “You Suck at Photoshop” — fade quick: When an entire season of a Web show adds up to fewer minutes than one episode of “True Blood,” the chance to make a lasting impression is fleeting indeed.
As time drags on and the genre remains chronically hitless, it’s fair to ask if perhaps the bite-size Web show is media’s version of Australopithecus afarensis, the short-lived hominid species that died off 3 million years ago to make way for humans.
So in 30 years, when Google archaeologists are exploring the era when television mated with the Internet, maybe they’ll dig up the digital fossils of these shows and have a quick laugh. Which is not to say there’s nothing good in Web TV — only that the genre itself might have evolved a little awkwardly. Its stumpy three-minute duration may simply be too short for it to survive. Still, some of the webisodes’ best traits will be no doubt be passed along on to future generations of this theoretical Intervision. And other traits won’t.
…
Shoes, guys, gadgets
As a plugged-in tech world personality — she Twitters, she blogs, she gets photographed at industry functions — Julia Allison has come to symbolize “Internet microcelebrity,” the condition of being extremely well known within a limited group of people (in Allison’s case, her blog gets about 30,000 page views a day, and about 3,000 people have made the more serious commitment to following her moment-to-moment activities via her Twitter feed). When Wired did a cover story in August on Allison and how she’s engineered her singular kind of fame, some expressed outrage that the magazine was even paying attention. (“Julia Allison is a terrible example of self-promotion, a warning of the missteps of public relations … WIRED ought to be ashamed,” as one blog put it.)
And so the natural next step is her own Web series, which launches Wenesday and is called “TMI Weekly.” But before you accuse her of being a social media climber, Allison swears she’s not in the market for a TV deal. On the phone Monday, the New York-based Allison insisted that the three-minute, three-times-a-week talk show was not some kind of steppingstone to Hollywood. “I’ve done TV,” Allison said on a conference call with her co-hosts and friends Meghan Asha and Mary Rambin. “I did 400 segments over the last year and a half on every major network. But I get so much more out of this! I can say what I really think.”
As long as what she really thinks fits into the show’s three-minute format, that is. The show, produced by Web network NextNewNetworks is being marketed as “‘The View’ meets ‘Digg Nation,’” the influential technology focused talk show on rival Web network Revision3. Inevitably, all involved with “TMI Weekly” also refer to “Sex and the City” to describe the demographic they’re aiming at — but it’s an iPhone/Twitter era, post-television “Sex and the City” crowd. In Allison’s world, there are no moody Carrie Bradshaw-esque stabs at literary depth, no storytelling. She and her friends cut right to the chase: the shoes, the guys, the gadgets.
Or as Tim Shey, NextNewNetworks’ head of entertainment programming, described the audience, “We see it as an underserved community — young women who aren’t really reached by television. They’re watching a lot of YouTube. They care about style, tech, iPhones — how do they balance their career, their life and their relationship?”
Each episode has a topic (to text or not when you’re stood up for a date?; cool new iPhone apps; is this outfit working?) and the hosts each have an area of focus: dating (Allison), gadgets and tech culture (Asha) and fashion and style (Rambin). Viewers can chime in too, of course, as part of the show’s built-in community.
Unlike “The View,” there are no guests from the outside world, and no debating politics or the issues of the day. “We don’t pretend to be a talk show,” Allison said. “We are a new iteration of that.” Their goal is to be more “real” than traditional TV: “With us when the camera is on and off, you get the same conversation,” Allison said.
That conversation feels a bit airless, though. The three hosts don’t agree on everything, but they seem like slight variations on the same personality: flirty, confident, interested in their topics only to the extent that the topics affect them personally; upbeat and “positive” no matter what. “We want to inspire our demographic to really kind of go outside and create their own lives, create their own destiny, they don’t have to get the MRS degree or work at a job they hate, really the sky’s the limit,”  Asha said.

By David Sarno & Maria Russo

Over the last half-decade, enterprising Web auteurs have created — and we’re ballparking, but this feels right — hundreds of original Internet TV series. There are production companies that churn them out, websites that warehouse them, and vast armies of amateurs who own a camera and aren’t afraid to use it. But from that crowded landscape of Web TV shows, who among us can name more than, we don’t know, two? Even the standouts — “Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog,” “Pink,” “You Suck at Photoshop” — fade quick: When an entire season of a Web show adds up to fewer minutes than one episode of “True Blood,” the chance to make a lasting impression is fleeting indeed.

As time drags on and the genre remains chronically hitless, it’s fair to ask if perhaps the bite-size Web show is media’s version of Australopithecus afarensis, the short-lived hominid species that died off 3 million years ago to make way for humans.

So in 30 years, when Google archaeologists are exploring the era when television mated with the Internet, maybe they’ll dig up the digital fossils of these shows and have a quick laugh. Which is not to say there’s nothing good in Web TV — only that the genre itself might have evolved a little awkwardly. Its stumpy three-minute duration may simply be too short for it to survive. Still, some of the webisodes’ best traits will be no doubt be passed along on to future generations of this theoretical Intervision. And other traits won’t.

Shoes, guys, gadgets

As a plugged-in tech world personality — she Twitters, she blogs, she gets photographed at industry functions — Julia Allison has come to symbolize “Internet microcelebrity,” the condition of being extremely well known within a limited group of people (in Allison’s case, her blog gets about 30,000 page views a day, and about 3,000 people have made the more serious commitment to following her moment-to-moment activities via her Twitter feed). When Wired did a cover story in August on Allison and how she’s engineered her singular kind of fame, some expressed outrage that the magazine was even paying attention. (“Julia Allison is a terrible example of self-promotion, a warning of the missteps of public relations … WIRED ought to be ashamed,” as one blog put it.)

And so the natural next step is her own Web series, which launches Wenesday and is called “TMI Weekly.” But before you accuse her of being a social media climber, Allison swears she’s not in the market for a TV deal. On the phone Monday, the New York-based Allison insisted that the three-minute, three-times-a-week talk show was not some kind of steppingstone to Hollywood. “I’ve done TV,” Allison said on a conference call with her co-hosts and friends Meghan Asha and Mary Rambin. “I did 400 segments over the last year and a half on every major network. But I get so much more out of this! I can say what I really think.”

As long as what she really thinks fits into the show’s three-minute format, that is. The show, produced by Web network NextNewNetworks is being marketed as “‘The View’ meets ‘Digg Nation,’” the influential technology focused talk show on rival Web network Revision3. Inevitably, all involved with “TMI Weekly” also refer to “Sex and the City” to describe the demographic they’re aiming at — but it’s an iPhone/Twitter era, post-television “Sex and the City” crowd. In Allison’s world, there are no moody Carrie Bradshaw-esque stabs at literary depth, no storytelling. She and her friends cut right to the chase: the shoes, the guys, the gadgets.

Or as Tim Shey, NextNewNetworks’ head of entertainment programming, described the audience, “We see it as an underserved community — young women who aren’t really reached by television. They’re watching a lot of YouTube. They care about style, tech, iPhones — how do they balance their career, their life and their relationship?”

Each episode has a topic (to text or not when you’re stood up for a date?; cool new iPhone apps; is this outfit working?) and the hosts each have an area of focus: dating (Allison), gadgets and tech culture (Asha) and fashion and style (Rambin). Viewers can chime in too, of course, as part of the show’s built-in community.

Unlike “The View,” there are no guests from the outside world, and no debating politics or the issues of the day. “We don’t pretend to be a talk show,” Allison said. “We are a new iteration of that.” Their goal is to be more “real” than traditional TV: “With us when the camera is on and off, you get the same conversation,” Allison said.

That conversation feels a bit airless, though. The three hosts don’t agree on everything, but they seem like slight variations on the same personality: flirty, confident, interested in their topics only to the extent that the topics affect them personally; upbeat and “positive” no matter what. “We want to inspire our demographic to really kind of go outside and create their own lives, create their own destiny, they don’t have to get the MRS degree or work at a job they hate, really the sky’s the limit,”  Asha said.

Sep 18, 08 12:00am
Julia Allison [is now] one of Wired's best-selling cover subjects of the past eight years.
The tech magazine’s August issue sold about 103,000 copies on the newsstand, according to numbers filed with ABC Rapid Report. That makes it the second-biggest seller of the year, after the April issue, which featured a cover story about every tech obsessive’s favorite topic, Apple, and sold 105,000 newsstand copies.
In fact, since 2000, only two other issues have sold more on the newsstand: February 2007, which featured “PC Guy” John Hodgman on the cover, and August 2006, which starred Stephen Colbert. Meanwhile, Allison outsold a host of genuine celebrities, including Sarah Silverman (Feb. 2008), Rupert Murdoch (July 2006), Jon Stewart (Sept. 2005) and Steven Spielberg, twice (June 2002 and June 2005).
Wired, by the way, is part of Condé Nast, the same company that owns Portfolio.

Julia Allison [is now] one of Wired's best-selling cover subjects of the past eight years.

The tech magazine’s August issue sold about 103,000 copies on the newsstand, according to numbers filed with ABC Rapid Report. That makes it the second-biggest seller of the year, after the April issue, which featured a cover story about every tech obsessive’s favorite topic, Apple, and sold 105,000 newsstand copies.

In fact, since 2000, only two other issues have sold more on the newsstand: February 2007, which featured “PC Guy” John Hodgman on the cover, and August 2006, which starred Stephen Colbert. Meanwhile, Allison outsold a host of genuine celebrities, including Sarah Silverman (Feb. 2008), Rupert Murdoch (July 2006), Jon Stewart (Sept. 2005) and Steven Spielberg, twice (June 2002 and June 2005).

Wired, by the way, is part of Condé Nast, the same company that owns Portfolio.